Tag Archives: Esketamine Virginia

KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER NORTHERN VIRGINIA| 703-844-0184 |DR. SENDI | NOVA HEALTH RECOVERY | KETAMINE DEPRESSION PTSD ANXIETY THERAPY | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER VIRGINIA| Spravato | 703-844-0184 | From Popular Anesthetic to Antidepressant, Ketamine Isn’t the Drug You Think It Is | FAIRFAX, VA 22101 | LOUDOUN COUNTY, VA 20176 | DR. SENDI | 703-844-0184 | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE CENTER | ESKETAMINE DOCTOR | 703-844-0184 | ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22207 22213 | NASAL SPRAY KETAMINE AND THE FDA APPROVAL| DR. SENDI | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER | NASAL SPRY KETAMINE THERAPY | KETAMINE FOR TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION, PTSD, ANXIETY | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE DEPRESSION | KETAMINE PTSD | EMAIL@NOVAHEALTHRECOVERY.COM | 2220 22182 23103 22039 20197 20184 22101 22102 22066 | CBD DOCTOR CBD CENTER | 703-844-0184 | FAIRFAX, VA 22034 | 22308 | ESKETAMINE LOUDOUN COUNTY, VA | ESKETAMINE ANNANDALE, VA | ESKETAMINE RICHMOND | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | KETAMINE SPRAY PROVIDER IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA 22308 | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | 703-844-0184 FOR AN APPOINTMENT | CBD PROVIDER | CBD CENTER | CBD VIRGINIA | DR. SENDI | NORTHERN VIRGINIA KETAMINE | KETAMINE CENTER | NASAL SPRAY KETAMINE | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER |MAGNESIUM AND COPPER AND DEPRESSION | NEW TREATMENTS FOR DEPRESSION | LOUDOUN COUNTY KETAMINE 703-844-0184 NORTHERN VIRGINIA | ARLINGTON, VA KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Call NOVA Health Recovery at 703-844-0184 for a free consultation for a Ketamine infusion. No referral needed. We offer intranasal Ketamine follow up therapy as well. Alexandria, Va 22306.

Call NOVA Health Recovery at 703-844-0184 for a free consultation for a Ketamine infusion. No referral needed. We offer intranasal Ketamine follow up therapy as well. Alexandria, Va 22306.

From Popular Anesthetic to Antidepressant, Ketamine Isn’t the Drug You Think It Is

An hour before we spoke, Darragh O’Carroll, an emergency room physician from Hawaii, had just given an elderly patient a sedating shot of ketamine. The man had pneumonia and was acting confused and fidgety, making him hard to treat.

“Not only it was a pain control for him when I was putting needles into his neck, but it also kept him still,” O’Carroll says. “And with very minimal risk of lowering his blood pressure.”

Ketamine’s use as an anesthetic — and not as a party drug — is widespread, though not commonly known. In fact, the World Health Organizationestimates ketamine is the most widely used anesthetic in the world and keeps it on their list of essential medicines, a category of drugs that all developed countries should have on hand.

O’Carroll has described ketamine as his “favorite medicine of all time” in an article for Tonic, not only because the anesthetic is incredibly safe and effective, but also because of its versatility. It’s most widely used in surgery, but could also help treat severe asthma, chronic pain, and may even possess anti-tumor properties. In the last two decades, ketamine has also emerged as a potent antidepressant, able to treat symptoms of some mental illnesses in less than 72 hours.

“I think the more research that goes into ketamine, the more uses that we find for it,” O’Carroll says.

From PCP to Painkiller

Ketamine’s story begins with a drug called PCP. Yes, that PCP — phencyclidine or so-called “angel dust,” a drug that when smoked can cause a trance-like state, agitation and out-of-body hallucinations. After it was first synthesized by medicinal chemist Victor Maddox in 1956, the drug was briefly approved as an anesthetic by the FDA for its sedative properties. In tests with a wild rhesus monkey, for example, researchers put their fingers in the previously aggressive animal’s mouth and watched its jaw remain slack.

But while it was safe and effective for pain relief, the side effects of PCP soon became too obvious to ignore.

Some patients under the influence of PCP would feel like they lost their arms or legs or that they were floating in space. It could also cause seizures and delirium. Scientists began seeking a shorter-acting anesthetic without convulsant properties. In 1962, chemistry professor Calvin Stevens discovered a PCP analogue that fit the bill: ketamine.

Ketamine is a potent, sedating painkiller that can cause amnesia and is mostly used in surgery and veterinary medicine. During the Vietnam Invasion, ketamine saw widespread use in the U.S. military because it has several advantages over opioids. First, unlike morphine, ketamine doesn’t suppress blood pressure or breathing. It also doesn’t need to be refrigerated, making it useful in the field or in rural areas that don’t have access to electricity.

Ketamine’s benefits extend beyond use as an anesthetic, though — in some cases it can serve as a balm for the mind as well. A 2008 analysis found that burn victims who were given ketamine were less likely to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, even if their injuries were more severe. Those findings have been replicated, such as a 2014 clinical trial of 41 patients, who saw their PTSD symptoms diminish within 24 hours, an effect that lasted for two weeks.

“When somebody gets one of their limbs dramatically blown off or is shot in the face, it’s a very traumatic event,” O’Carroll says. In such a situation, giving ketamine not only provides instant pain relief, it could prevent long-lasting trauma.

Because its chemical structure is so similar to PCP, ketamine can still give lucid hallucinations, such as feeling that your mind has separated from the body — a dissociative state users sometimes call a “K-hole.” One recent study based on users’ written reports even indicated that this kind of experience might be a close analogue to a near-death experience. However, these dissociative states only happen at high doses — the amount of ketamine used to for surgery and to treat depression is typically much lower.

But ketamine’s side effects are less common and easier to manage than PCP. In fact, ketamine is one of the safest drugs used in medicine today and can even be given to young children. For example, ketamine was used to sedatethe boys’ soccer team trapped in a cave in Thailand last year. Putting the kids in a tranquilized state made it easier to rescue them, and ketamine is safer than the opioids or benzodiazepines that are also commonly used as sedatives.  

Ketamine as Antidepressant

But it wasn’t until the 1990s that what could turn out to be ketamine’s most important function was discovered. A team from Yale University School of Medicine was examining the role of glutamate, a common neurotransmitter, in depression, and discovered something remarkable: ketamine could rapidly relieve depression symptoms.

“To our surprise, the patients started saying, they were better in a few hours,” Dennis Charney, one of the researchers, told Bloomberg. This rapid relief was unheard of in psychiatry.

Glutamate is associated with neural plasticity, our brain’s ability to adapt and change at the level of the neuron. Ketamine blocks certain glutamate receptors, but not others, and the end effect could be to promote the growth of new neurons while protecting old ones. This could explain how ketamine can help reset the brain, though the theory hasn’t yet been definitively proven.

The prescription meds currently on the market for depression have some major drawbacks. Drugs like Prozac or Wellbutrin can take a few weeks or months to kick in while worsening symptoms in the short term — not a good combination, especially for someone who is extremely depressed, or even suicidal.

It took around a decade for mainstream science to take notice of these early ketamine-depression studies. But once it did, ketamine clinics began popping up all across North America, offering fast relief for depression, anxiety and other mental illnesses. Patients are given an infusion — an IV drip that lasts about an hour — and many people, but not everyone, have seen rapid relief of their symptoms.

Suddenly, ketamine infusions became trendy, though the science to back up some of the medical claims is still inconclusive, according to STAT. However, ketamine infusions are rarely covered by insurance, although that is changing. A typical session can run $700, with many patients taking six sessions or more. But many of these patients have so-called treatment-resistant depression. They’ve tried other medications or therapies without success and some see ketamine as a last resort.

Steven Mandel, a clinical psychologist and anesthesiologist, has used ketamine on patients since it first came on the market around 50 years ago. In 2014, he began using it for patients with depression and opened Ketamine Clinics of Los Angeles, one of the oldest and largest clinics in the country. They’ve done over 8,000 infusions so far.

“Our success rate is better than 83 percent,” Mandel says. For his clinic, success means a 50 percent improvement of depression symptoms for longer than three months.

Ketamine’s success as an antidepressant couldn’t help but attract the attention of major pharmaceutical companies as well. In 2009, Johnson & Johnson began developing their own version of the drug they called esketamine. Rather than an infusion through a vein, it’s dispensed through a nasal spray. The FDA approved their formulation in early March. It was thefirst drug in 35 years to fight depression using a different approach than traditional drugs.

“Esketamine is a giant step forward,” Mandel says. “It means we’re not going to be demonizing mind-altering substances used for therapeutic purposes. It opens the door to research on LSD, on psilocybin, on MDMA and many other agents that could possibly relieve a great deal of suffering.”

But many clinicians have raised concerns about long-term side effects, such as heart and bladder toxicity. Others have been critical of esketamine, saying there isn’t enough data yet to suggest the drug is safe or effective. Husseini Manji, a neuroscientist who helped develop the drug for Johnson & Johnson at their subsidiary Janssen, has pushed back against these claims.

“When you line up the totality of the studies, it was really an overwhelming amount of data that was all in the same direction,” Manji says in a call. Though just two of the five late-state clinical trials showed significant results, the changes in mood in the three that fell short were “almost identical in magnitude” to the others, Manji says. It was enough for the drug to meet standards for FDA approval.

We can probably expect other ketamine-related drugs to come to market soon. ATAI Life Sciences, a company funding research on the use of magic mushrooms for depression, is developing their own ketamine depression drug. The pharmaceutical company Allergan also developed rapastinel, another ketamine-like drug, though it failed to show any real benefits for patients in later trials. Manji says this is unfortunate for people who could be helped by these kinds of drugs.

“From a patient standpoint, we were hoping it would work,” he says, even though he was not involved in rapastinel’s development. “But sometimes if you really haven’t got the mechanism right and you haven’t really threaded the needle, then sometimes you don’t see these results.”

Drug of Abuse?

Even though ketamine’s medical uses are well-established, most people have only heard of ketamine in the context of a party drug. Because of this bad reputation — and what’s perceived as growing misuse of the drug — several countries, such as China and the UK, have tried to place greater restrictions on ketamine. This would make it harder to study and more expensive in clinical use.

“If it was to ever be rescheduled, places that would be first affected would be you know places that need it most,” O’Carroll says. The WHO has asked at least four times for countries to keep access to ketamine open. “The medical benefits of ketamine far outweigh potential harm from recreational use,” Marie-Paule Kieny, assistant director general for Health Systems and Innovation at WHO, said in 2015.

So far, no countries have put greater restrictions on ketamine, and that’s probably a good thing. Ketamine has a rich history, but its future is still being written.

Ketamine Infusion Center Northern Virginia| 703-844-0184 |Dr. Sendi | NOVA Health recovery | Ketamine Depression PTSD Anxiety Therapy | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER VIRGINIA| 703-844-0184 | NOVA HEALTH RECOVERY | FAIRFAX, VA 22101 | LOUDOUN COUNTY, VA 20176 | DR. SEND | 703-844-0184 | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE CENTER | ESKETAMINE DOCTOR | 703-844-0184 | ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22207 22213 | NASAL SPRAY KETAMINE AND THE FDA APPROVAL| DR. SENDI | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER | NASAL SPRY KETAMINE THERAPY | KETAMINE FOR TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION, PTSD, ANXIETY | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE DEPRESSION | KETAMINE PTSD | EMAIL@NOVAHEALTHRECOVERY.COM | 2220 22182 23103 22039 20197 20184 22101 22102 22066 | CBD DOCTOR CBD CENTER | 703-844-0184 | FAIRFAX, VA 22034 | 22308 | ESKETAMINE LOUDOUN COUNTY, VA | ESKETAMINE ANNANDALE, VA | ESKETAMINE RICHMOND | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | KETAMINE SPRAY PROVIDER IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA 22308 | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | 703-844-0184 FOR AN APPOINTMENT | CBD PROVIDER | CBD CENTER | CBD VIRGINIA | DR. SENDI | NORTHERN VIRGINIA KETAMINE | KETAMINE CENTER |MAGNESIUM AND COPPER AND DEPRESSION | NEW TREATMENTS FOR DEPRESSION | LOUDOUN COUNTY KETAMINE 703-844-0184 NORTHERN VIRGINIA | ARLINGTON, VA KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

Twitter feed Ketamine – Ablow

Ketamine Seems to Ease Depression. We’ll Soon See What Else It Does.

Clinical trials are not enough to prove any drug is safe and effective – especially one that could be as widely used as Johnson & Johnson’s depression drug esketamine, a slightly altered form of the street drug ketamine. The FDA approval process is a balancing act, weighing safety and efficacy testing against the need to get potentially life-saving drugs out as soon as possible.

An advisory panel to the FDA decided this month that the benefits outweigh the risks, and approval is expected soon. But scientists who study depression say there’s a lot more to learn about esketamine’s long-term effects.

While best known as a recreational drug, ketamine has been used since the 1970s as an anesthetic, in doses much higher than what’s likely to be given to depression patients. The trials so far seem to show that the drug is not highly addictive, according to a story in the medical website STAT. But time will tell.

The most promising clinical trials followed people whose depression had been resistant to conventional therapy. Fifty percent of patients improved when given conventional therapy plus a placebo, as compared to 70 percent who got conventional therapy and esketamine.

Taking the drug will be a lot more complicated than taking Prozac. It’s been formulated so that it can be delivered as a nasal spray, but people have to get the drug at a doctor’s office, and they won’t be allowed to drive for at least 24 hours, said Gerard Sanacora, a Yale University psychiatrist who has been involved in the clinical trials.

He said he believes there’s potential for benefit, because the drug works for some people who get no relief from conventional treatments and because works faster, which might even prevent suicide. But there’s a lot more to learn about the drug’s potential long-term consequences. So far it looks like people will get two treatments a week to start, then one for maintenance. But scientists don’t know whether it can be tapered down further, or discontinued, and whether there’s a risk for relapse, he said.

Sanacora said that ketamine is based on a very different model of how depression works. Standard therapy is based on the principle that depression is a chemical imbalance involving the transmitting chemical serotonin. But an alternative view started to take shape in the 1990s that depression was more of a problem with the connections between neurons, triggered by chronic stress and mediated by something called the glutaminergic system.

Because ketamine interacts with this system, researchers started testing it as a depression drug. Although it seems effective, there’s still no agreement on how depression actually works – and there is some concern that it might work very differently in different patients.

Ketamine can affect cardiovascular health, and in the short term can cause patients to lose their sense of their bodies’ position in space – the sense of proprioception. They sometimes feel their arms are floating.

That hasn’t stopped people from flocking to clinics to get treated with IV ketamine infusions for depression and other problems. This is legal because the drug is approved for anesthesia, and prescribers can use it off-label for other purposes. An investigation by the medical website STAT raised concerns that clinic staff didn’t have the necessary expertise, and there was considerable marketing hype in many cases. The infusions cost between $350 and $1,000 each, and can go on for five or six treatments.

Another red flag popped up last week when the Boston Globe ran a storyabout three women who claim to have been sexually abused by psychiatrist Keith Ablow – a frequent commentator for Fox News. The Globe reported that Ablow was treating the women with ketamine, and one expert cited in the lawsuits said a patient had become “very dependent on this medication and dependent on Dr. Ablow to supply it.”

Ablow’s Twitter feed is full of positive stories about ketamine in places such as Reader’s Digest, followed by a phone number to call for a “free ketamine screening.” The allegations illustration that it’s not just patients that will need to be tracked for abuse, but the doctors as well.

On the positive side, FDA approval would give patients who want the drug a standardized treatment that would be covered by many insurance plans. Approval also creates an opportunity to collect data on longer-term use. (An earlier column exploring the promise of big data in medicine points out that clinical trials are often not long-running enough or big enough to catch even deadly side effects.)

Yale’s Sanacora thinks of the next series of trials as Phase 4. Sanacora also brought up what he poignantly called the “Flowers for Algernon” effect, referring to the short story in which the main character, Charlie Gordon, is treated for an intellectual disability. The treatment works, but eventually wears off, leaving Charlie back where he started. The disappointment makes for a tragic tale. An arc like this would be the last thing depression patients need – though if no other treatment is helping, it might be a risk worth taking.

KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER VIRGINIA| 703-844-0184 | NOVA HEALTH RECOVERY | FAIRFAX, VA 22101 | Loudoun County, Va 20176 | Dr. Send | 703-844-0184 | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE CENTER | ESKETAMINE DOCTOR | 703-844-0184 | ARLINGTON, VIRGINIA 22207 22213 | NASAL SPRAY KETAMINE AND THE FDA APPROVAL| DR. SENDI | ESKETAMINE PROVIDER | NASAL SPRY KETAMINE THERAPY | KETAMINE FOR TREATMENT OF DEPRESSION, PTSD, ANXIETY | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE DEPRESSION | KETAMINE PTSD | EMAIL@NOVAHEALTHRECOVERY.COM | 2220 22182 23103 22039 20197 20184 22101 22102 22066 | CBD DOCTOR CBD CENTER | 703-844-0184 | FAIRFAX, VA 22034 | 22308 | ESKETAMINE LOUDOuN COUNTY, VA | ESKETAMINE ANNANDALE, VA | ESKETAMINE RICHMOND | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | KETAMINE SPRAY PROVIDER IN NORTHERN VIRGINIA 22308 | KETAMINE INFUSION CENTER | KETAMINE VIRGINIA | ESKETAMINE VIRGINIA | 703-844-0184 FOR AN APPOINTMENT | CBD PROVIDER | CBD CENTER | CBD VIRGINIA | DR. SENDI | NORTHERN VIRGINIA KETAMINE | KETAMINE CENTER |MAGNESIUM AND COPPER AND DEPRESSION | NEW TREATMENTS FOR DEPRESSION | LOUDOUN COUNTY KETAMINE 703-844-0184 NORTHERN VIRGINIA | Arlington, Va Ketamine Infusion Center

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184 < Link

Ketamine Virginia Link

Ketamine Works as a Fast-Acting Antidepressant, But the Full Effects Are Still Unknown

Ketamine Works as a Fast-Acting Antidepressant, But the Full Effects Are Still Unknown

etamine leads something of a double life, straddling the line between medical science and party drug. Since it’s invention in the early 1960s, ketamine has enjoyed a quiet existence as a veterinary and pediatric anesthetic given in high doses. But in a second, wilder life, ketamine’s effects at lower doses—a profound sense of dissociation from self and body—became an illicit favorite among psychedelic enthusiasts. Pioneering neuroscientist John Lilly, who famously attempted to facilitate communication between humans and dolphins, used the drug in the late 1970s during experiments in sensory deprivation tanks. By the 1990s, the drug had made its way to the dance floor as “special K.”

More recently, ketamine has taken on a third, wholly unexpected role. Since the early 2000s, the drug has been studied as a uniquely powerful medication for treating severe depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). When given as an intravenous infusion, ketamine can lift symptoms of depression and OCD from patients who fail to respond to common antidepressants like Prozac and even resist treatments like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Exactly how ketamine produces antidepressant effects remains unclear, however. Antidepressants like Prozac are Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) that increase levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain, which is believed to boost mood. Ketamine’s main mechanism of action to produce dissociative anesthetic effects, on the other hand, depends on another neurotransmitter, glutamate.

“The prevailing hypothesis for ketamine’s antidepressant effect is that it blocks a receptor (or docking port) for glutamate,” says Carolyn Rodriguez, a professor of psychiatry at Stanford who has conducted some of the pioneering research into ketamine as an OCD treatment.

However, new research suggests that ketamine’s influence on glutamate receptors, and specifically the NMDA receptor, may not be the sole cause of its antidepressant effects. According to a recent study in the American Journal of Psychiatry by Rodriguez and her Stanford colleagues, ketamine might also activate a third system in the brain: opioid receptors.

Ketamine is known to bind weakly to the mu opioid receptor, acting as an agonist to produce a physiological response at the same site in the brain where narcotics like morphine exert their influence. It’s also known that opioids can have antidepressant effects, says Alan Schatzberg, a professor of psychiatry at Stanford and co-author of the new study.

It never made sense to Schatzberg that ketamine’s antidepressant effects were a result of blocking the glutamate receptors, as attempts to use other glutamate-blocking drugs as antidepressants have largely failed. The Stanford psychiatrist, who has spent his career studying depression, wondered if researchers were unknowingly activating opioid receptors with ketamine.

“You could test this by using an antagonist of the opioid system to see if you blocked the effect in people who are ketamine responders,” he says. “And that’s what we did.”

The researchers enlisted 12 subjects with treatment-resistant depression and gave them either an infusion of ketamine preceded by a placebo, or ketamine preceded by a dose of naltrexone, an opioid receptor blocker. Of those, seven subjects responded to the ketamine with placebo, “and it was very dramatic,” Schatzberg says, with depression lifting by the next day. “But in the other condition, they showed no effect,” suggesting it was the opioid receptor activity, not blocking glutamate receptors, that was responsible.

While opioid blockers prevented ketamine from activating the associated receptors, it did not block the drugs dissociative effects, suggesting dissociation alone won’t affect depression. “It’s not that, ‘hey, we’ll get you a little weird and you’ll get the effect,’” Schatzberg says.

The appeal of ketamine’s use as an antidepressant is clear enough. While more typical antidepressants may require six to eight weeks to produce benefits, ketamine works within hours.

“Our patients are asked to hang in there until the medication and talk therapy takes effect,” says Carlos Zarate, chief of the experimental therapeutics and pathophysiology branch of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) who was not associated with the new study. While waiting for traditional treatments to kick in, patients “may lose their friends or even attempt suicide.”

But the study linking ketamine to opioid activity means an extra dose of caution is required. While ketamine acts quickly, the anti-depressive effects of the drug only last for a few days to a week, meaning repeat doses would be needed in practice. Researchers and clinicians should consider the risk of addiction in long-term use, Schatzberg says. “You’re going to eventually get into some form of tolerance I think, and that’s not good.”

However, the new finding is based on just seven subjects, and it still needs to be replicated by other scientists, says Yale professor of psychiatry Greg Sanacora, who was not involved in the new study. And even if the trial is replicated, it would not prove ketamine’s opioid activity is responsible for its antidepressant effects.

“It doesn’t show that at all,” says Sanacora, who studies glutamate, mood disorders and ketamine. “It shows that the opioid system needs to be functioning in order to get this response.”

Sanacora compares the new study to using antibiotics to treat an ear infection. If you administered an additional drug that blocks absorption of antibiotics in the stomach, you would block treatment of the ear infection, but you wouldn’t conclude that antibiotics fight ear infections through stomach absorption—you just need a normally functioning stomach to allow the antibiotic to do its job. Similarly, opioid receptors might need to be functioning normally for ketamine to produce antidepressant effects, even if opioid activity is not directly responsible for those effects.

Complicating matters further, placebos often cause patients to experience less pain, but opioid blockers like naltrexone have been shown to prevent this response, according to Sanacora. It could be, he suggests, that all the apparatus of the clinic—the nursing staff, the equipment—exerted a placebo effect that is mediated by the brain’s opioid system, and the patients who received naltrexone simply did not respond to that placebo effect

“That’s a very important and powerful tool that is in all of medicine, not just in psychiatry,” Sanacora says. “And we know that the opiate system is involved, to some extent, in that type of response.”

It’s also possible, the researchers note in the paper, that ketamine’s action at the glutamate receptor is still important. “Ketamine acts in three distinct phases—rapid effects, sustained effects and return to baseline,” Rodriguez says. Opioid signaling may turn out to mediate ketamine’s rapid effects, while “the glutamate system may be responsible for the sustaining effects after ketamine is metabolized.”

One interpretation is that ketamine blocks glutamate receptors on neurons that are inhibitory, meaning they signal other neurons to fire fewer signals. By blocking these neurons from firing, ketamine may enhance glutamate activity in the rest of the brain, producing anti-depressive effects that persist after the opioid activity dies down.

“The reality is it’s in a gray zone,” Sanacora says. “This is just one small piece of a very large puzzle or concern that we really need to look at the data in total.”

That data is forthcoming. Results from a Janssen Pharmaceuticals clinical trial using esketamine, an isomer of ketamine, and involving hundreds of subjects will soon become public, according to Sanacora, who has consulted for the company. And at NIMH, Zarate and colleagues are studying hydroxynorketamine, a metabolite of ketamine that may provide the same benefits but without the dissociative side effects

Ketamine Works as a Fast-Acting Antidepressant, But the Full Effects Are Still Unknown

A new study suggests that ketamine activates the brain’s opioid receptors, complicating its use to treat clinical depression

Ketamine Syringe
Ketamine syringe, 10mg held by a healthcare professional. (Peter Cripps / Alamy Stock Photo)

By Jon KelveySEPTEMBER 11, 2018777110231.1K

Ketamine leads something of a double life, straddling the line between medical science and party drug. Since it’s invention in the early 1960s, ketamine has enjoyed a quiet existence as a veterinary and pediatric anesthetic given in high doses. But in a second, wilder life, ketamine’s effects at lower doses—a profound sense of dissociation from self and body—became an illicit favorite among psychedelic enthusiasts. Pioneering neuroscientist John Lilly, who famously attempted to facilitate communication between humans and dolphins, used the drug in the late 1970s during experiments in sensory deprivation tanks. By the 1990s, the drug had made its way to the dance floor as “special K.”

More recently, ketamine has taken on a third, wholly unexpected role. Since the early 2000s, the drug has been studied as a uniquely powerful medication for treating severe depression and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). When given as an intravenous infusion, ketamine can lift symptoms of depression and OCD from patients who fail to respond to common antidepressants like Prozac and even resist treatments like electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Exactly how ketamine produces antidepressant effects remains unclear, however. Antidepressants like Prozac are Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) that increase levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain, which is believed to boost mood. Ketamine’s main mechanism of action to produce dissociative anesthetic effects, on the other hand, depends on another neurotransmitter, glutamate.

“The prevailing hypothesis for ketamine’s antidepressant effect is that it blocks a receptor (or docking port) for glutamate,” says Carolyn Rodriguez, a professor of psychiatry at Stanford who has conducted some of the pioneering research into ketamine as an OCD treatment.

However, new research suggests that ketamine’s influence on glutamate receptors, and specifically the NMDA receptor, may not be the sole cause of its antidepressant effects. According to a recent study in the American Journal of Psychiatry by Rodriguez and her Stanford colleagues, ketamine might also activate a third system in the brain: opioid receptors.

Ketamine is known to bind weakly to the mu opioid receptor, acting as an agonist to produce a physiological response at the same site in the brain where narcotics like morphine exert their influence. It’s also known that opioids can have antidepressant effects, says Alan Schatzberg, a professor of psychiatry at Stanford and co-author of the new study.

It never made sense to Schatzberg that ketamine’s antidepressant effects were a result of blocking the glutamate receptors, as attempts to use other glutamate-blocking drugs as antidepressants have largely failed. The Stanford psychiatrist, who has spent his career studying depression, wondered if researchers were unknowingly activating opioid receptors with ketamine.

“You could test this by using an antagonist of the opioid system to see if you blocked the effect in people who are ketamine responders,” he says. “And that’s what we did.”

The researchers enlisted 12 subjects with treatment-resistant depression and gave them either an infusion of ketamine preceded by a placebo, or ketamine preceded by a dose of naltrexone, an opioid receptor blocker. Of those, seven subjects responded to the ketamine with placebo, “and it was very dramatic,” Schatzberg says, with depression lifting by the next day. “But in the other condition, they showed no effect,” suggesting it was the opioid receptor activity, not blocking glutamate receptors, that was responsible.

While opioid blockers prevented ketamine from activating the associated receptors, it did not block the drugs dissociative effects, suggesting dissociation alone won’t affect depression. “It’s not that, ‘hey, we’ll get you a little weird and you’ll get the effect,’” Schatzberg says.

The appeal of ketamine’s use as an antidepressant is clear enough. While more typical antidepressants may require six to eight weeks to produce benefits, ketamine works within hours.

“Our patients are asked to hang in there until the medication and talk therapy takes effect,” says Carlos Zarate, chief of the experimental therapeutics and pathophysiology branch of the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) who was not associated with the new study. While waiting for traditional treatments to kick in, patients “may lose their friends or even attempt suicide.”

<

A treatment that works within 24 hours? “That’s huge.”

A vial of ketamine. The drug is used primarily as an anesthetic but is gaining popularity as an effective antidepressant.
A vial of ketamine. The drug is used primarily as an anesthetic but is gaining popularity as an effective antidepressant. (Wikimedia Commons)

But the study linking ketamine to opioid activity means an extra dose of caution is required. While ketamine acts quickly, the anti-depressive effects of the drug only last for a few days to a week, meaning repeat doses would be needed in practice. Researchers and clinicians should consider the risk of addiction in long-term use, Schatzberg says. “You’re going to eventually get into some form of tolerance I think, and that’s not good.”

However, the new finding is based on just seven subjects, and it still needs to be replicated by other scientists, says Yale professor of psychiatry Greg Sanacora, who was not involved in the new study. And even if the trial is replicated, it would not prove ketamine’s opioid activity is responsible for its antidepressant effects.

“It doesn’t show that at all,” says Sanacora, who studies glutamate, mood disorders and ketamine. “It shows that the opioid system needs to be functioning in order to get this response.”

Sanacora compares the new study to using antibiotics to treat an ear infection. If you administered an additional drug that blocks absorption of antibiotics in the stomach, you would block treatment of the ear infection, but you wouldn’t conclude that antibiotics fight ear infections through stomach absorption—you just need a normally functioning stomach to allow the antibiotic to do its job. Similarly, opioid receptors might need to be functioning normally for ketamine to produce antidepressant effects, even if opioid activity is not directly responsible for those effects.

Complicating matters further, placebos often cause patients to experience less pain, but opioid blockers like naltrexone have been shown to prevent this response, according to Sanacora. It could be, he suggests, that all the apparatus of the clinic—the nursing staff, the equipment—exerted a placebo effect that is mediated by the brain’s opioid system, and the patients who received naltrexone simply did not respond to that placebo effect.

“That’s a very important and powerful tool that is in all of medicine, not just in psychiatry,” Sanacora says. “And we know that the opiate system is involved, to some extent, in that type of response.”

It’s also possible, the researchers note in the paper, that ketamine’s action at the glutamate receptor is still important. “Ketamine acts in three distinct phases—rapid effects, sustained effects and return to baseline,” Rodriguez says. Opioid signaling may turn out to mediate ketamine’s rapid effects, while “the glutamate system may be responsible for the sustaining effects after ketamine is metabolized.”

One interpretation is that ketamine blocks glutamate receptors on neurons that are inhibitory, meaning they signal other neurons to fire fewer signals. By blocking these neurons from firing, ketamine may enhance glutamate activity in the rest of the brain, producing anti-depressive effects that persist after the opioid activity dies down.

“The reality is it’s in a gray zone,” Sanacora says. “This is just one small piece of a very large puzzle or concern that we really need to look at the data in total.”

That data is forthcoming. Results from a Janssen Pharmaceuticals clinical trial using esketamine, an isomer of ketamine, and involving hundreds of subjects will soon become public, according to Sanacora, who has consulted for the company. And at NIMH, Zarate and colleagues are studying hydroxynorketamine, a metabolite of ketamine that may provide the same benefits but without the dissociative side effects.

The ultimate goal of all this research is to find a ketamine-like drug with fewer liabilities, and that aim is bringing researchers back to the fundamentals of science.

“For me, one of the exciting parts of this study is that it suggests that ketamine’s mechanism is complicated, it acts on different receptors beyond glutamate and is the start of this exciting dialogue,” Rodriguez says. “Sometimes great science raises more questions than answers.”

Esketamine center | Esketamine Doctor | 703-844-0184 | Arlington, Virginia 22207 22213 | NOVA Health Recovery | Dr. Sendi | Esketamine provider | Nasal spry ketamine therapy | Ketamine for treatment of depression, PTSD, anxiety | Ketamine Infusion Center | Ketamine depression | Ketamine PTSD | email@novahealthrecovery.com | 2220 22182 23103 22039 20197 20184 22101 22102 22066 | CBD doctor CBD Center | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22034 | 22308 | Esketamine Loudon County, Va | Esketamine Annandale, Va | Esketamine Richmond



 

NOVA Health Recovery | Alexandria, Va 22306 | Call for esketamine and nasal ketamine as well as IV Ketamine for depression, PTSD, anxiety  703-844-0184

Allergan and Lundbeck await depression and mania data

Allergan needs a win with rapastinel, while Lundbeck’s chief exec faces her second clinical challenge.

Calendar pin 14th

Welcome to your weekly digest of approaching regulatory and clinical readouts. After a tough 2018 Allergan needs some good news, and it will soon find out if its depression project rapastinel will provide it. Three phase III trials of the project are due to yield topline data in the first half of this year.

Rapastinel targets the NMDA receptor, making it similar to Johnson & Johnson’s ketamine enantiomer esketamine. The J&J candidate is under US review with a PDUFA date of May 2019, though continuing US government shutdown could put approval in doubt.

Although the two projects are often mentioned in the same breath they act differently: rapastinel is a partial agonist of the NMDA receptor, while esketamine blocks it. This way, Allergan hopes, its project might not have the same psychomimetic effects as ketamine and, to a lesser extent, esketamine.

Dissociation – becoming less aware of one’s surroundings – has been seen with the J&J project. Allergan will want to show a safety edge with rapastinel, but stronger efficacy versus esketamine would not go amiss either. Still, Bernstein analysts only give rapastinel a 50% chance of success.

The three phase III trials of rapastinel test the project on top of standard antidepressants in patients with a partial response to the existing drugs. The primary endpoint of all three is change in Montgomery-Asberg depression rating scale (MADRS) at three weeks.

Esketamine itself had mixed results in its pivotal programme: the Transform-2 trial met its primary endpoint, but Transform-3 and Transform-1 did not. Across the three studies, which tested esketamine on top of an oral antidepressant, the reduction in MADRS score at four weeks was 3.2-4.1 points.

Allergan is also developing an oral NMDA modulator, AGN-241751, but this has only just entered phase II. The company, which faced calls for a break-up last year, needs a nearer-term boost, and with 2024 sales forecasts of $505m rapastinel is its biggest pipeline hope.

Selected upcoming rapastinel phase III readouts
NameSetting Trial ID Primary completion
RAP-MD-01Adjunctive therapy NCT02932943Nov 2018
RAP-MD-02Adjunctive therapy NCT02943564Nov 2018
RAP-MD-03Adjunctive therapy NCT02943577Nov 2018
RAP-MD-06 Long-term safety study, adjunctive therapyNCT03002077Nov 2018
RAP-MD-04 Adjunctive therapy, relapse preventionNCT02951988Sep 2019
RAP-MD-32MonotherapyNCT03560518Feb 2020
RAP-MD-30 MonotherapyNCT03675776Dec 2020
RAP-MD-99 Adjunctive or monotherapyNCT03668600Feb 2021
RAP-MD-33 Monotherapy, relapse preventionNCT03614156Jul 2021
Source: EvaluatePharma, Clinicaltrials.gov.

Second test

The two upcoming phase III readouts for Lundbeck’s antipsychotic Rexulti in bipolar mania might not be game changing: there are already approved drugs for this indication, and existing off-label use of antipsychotics is being fuelled by increasing genericisation.

Still, the data will be interesting as they represent the second clinical stock catalyst for Lundbeck’s new chief executive, Deborah Dunsire. The first was the failure of Lu AF35700 in treatment-resistant schizophrenia, and drove shares down almost 30%.

Some analysts do not think that success in bipolar mania will add materially to Rexulti sales, but the downside risk of a second negative trial readout is substantially greater given the lack of other catalysts.

The two bipolar trials have enrolled 322 and 333 patients, the active cohorts given 2-4mg of Rexulti for 21 days, with a six-month follow-up. The primary endpoint is change in the Young-mania rating scale, and a key secondary endpoint is clinical global impression-bipolar (CGI BP) severity-of-illness score in mania.

Even if there is improvement in severity of illness, success in bipolar mania will at best be a nice-to-have addition to Rexulti’s current uses in schizophrenia and major depressive disorder, according to analysts at Leerink.

A more exciting event for Lundbeck will be whether Rexulti can have an impact on agitation in Alzheimer’s disease, where Bernstein analysts reckon success could add $1bn of sales. However, previous data have been mixed.

For now, if Rexulti does not deliver the goods in the more immediate bipolar indication, the market could seize it as an opportunity to punish the stock further.

Selected upcoming Rexulti phase III readouts
SettingTrial IDData due
Bipolar manic episodesNCT03259555Q1 2019
Bipolar manic episodesNCT03257865Q1 2019
Alzheimer’s agitationNCT035485842020
Alzheimer’s agitationNCT035941232021
Alzheimer’s agitationNCT037249422021
Source: EvaluatePharma, Clinicaltrials.gov.